Stats Essentials for Math-Averse Reporters

Many journalists lack confidence when including numbers in their reporting, or they fear misrepresenting the data when it comes to covering facts and figures, studies, or technical reports. This free, one-hour “crash course”—designed for reporters who cover science, health, or environment issues but lack statistics or data training—aims to take the stress out of reporting on the numbers that could be crucial to your next story.

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Tori Espensen and Emily Mueller—Ph.D. scientists and trained science communicators—will lead a 45-minute presentation and 15-minutes of open Q&A on Monday, January 29, from 12-1 p.m. MT that will help you:

Understand statistical concepts such as risk and odds, correlation strength, absolute and relative numbers, and statistical significance and how to use them in your reporting;
Explain to your audience how much uncertainty exists around a given finding and how to judge the strength and importance of that finding;
Recognize statistical red flags that should prompt deeper questions about a study or dataset; and
Include numbers and data in your reporting in ways that are accessible, clear, and meaningful to readers/listeners/viewers.

REGISTRATION IS FREE AND OPEN TO LOCAL AND GENERAL ASSIGNMENT PRINT, RADIO, AND TV REPORTERS.

Can’t make this session? Here’s our schedule for future dates of this course:
June 25, 2024
October 24, 2024

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